Salted Caramel Pear Bavarois Cake

salted caramel pear cake2

It has been some time that I haven’t bake a cake since I have started a new job more than a month ago.  On the second day my boss asked me for a retention strategy.  Jobs pile up.  Yes, it continues still as of today.   But I am getting used to it.  I started browsing cake photos for ideas.  Yue is one of the few blogs that I browse from time to time.  And, I found this pear cake. I like the idea of Japanese cotton cake.  It’s unusual.  It was good, very soft and with a nicer texture than sponge cake.  And it’s moist.  But I will use perhaps 3 eggs and half of the portion only.  The cake rose high and the cake layers were thick.  Thinner layers will require less mousse.  My mousse made with 360g whipped cream was barely sufficient.  Pear dices top the surface like the surface of the moon.  Don’t mind, it looked natural and tasted good.  It receive many compliments from colleagues.

This recipe is largely from Yue, that is, the cotton cake and the pear compote (used 3 instead of 2 pears; and it can be still half pear more)

Salted Caramel Pear Cake3

Japanese Cotton Cake (18cm square tin)
60g unsalted butter, softened
80g plain flour, sifted
80g full fat milk
6 eggs
80g sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
Pinch of salt

I would have half the portion next time.  6 eggs resulted in a tall cake.  It required much more Bavarios.

Salted Caramel Pear Cake Japanese Cotton CakeSeparate 5 egg whites & yolks, refrigerate the egg whites until needed.

Line a piece of baking paper on a 18cm square baking pan.

In a small saucepan, bring the butter to boil under gentle heat, remove from heating & immediately fold in the flour.

Pour & fold in the milk in 2-3 portions until combine.

Mix 5 egg yolks with 1 whole egg, pour & fold to the batter in 2-3 times until combine, set aside to rest for at least 15 min.

In a large bowl, combine egg whites & salt, whisk at high speed until it’s foamy.

Whisk in the sugar in 2-3 portions, continue whisking to just before stiff peaks.

Fold 1/3 meringue into the egg yolk batter until combined.

Pour the egg yolk batter to the remaining meringue & fold gently until smooth & combined.

Pour into the prepared tin & tap gently to remove large air bubbles.

Put it in a large baking pan & fill with some cold water (about 1/3 height of the cake tin).

Bake in a preheated oven at 140C for 60-70 min. Mine was 47 min.

Remove from oven & turn the cake upside down to cool on wired rack.

Salted Caramel Pear Cake

Pear Compote
3 pears, peeled, cored & quartered
196 ml white wine (small bottle)
45g sugar
1/2 lemon, zest only
1 tsp vanilla essence

Put all ingredients except pears in a large cooking pot, gently bring it to boil.
Put in the pears & simmer for 20 min, set aside to cool.
Drain & reserve the white wine.
Cut the pears into smaller pieces & set aside until needed.

IMG_8986

Salted Caramel Sauce
30g granulated sugar
12g honey
50 ml double cream, warm
Pinch of sea salt

Caramelise the sugar & carefully pour the whipping cream, stir until smooth.

 

Salted Caramel Pear Cake slice2

Bavarois
75g milk
3 egg yolks
90g sugar
9g sheet gelatin, bloomed
360g whipping cream, whipped

Beat the cream till soft peaks form

In a small saucepan, bring milk to boil.

In another saucepan, combine egg yolks & sugar. Pour in the milk and stir to reach 82°C or until the mixture is thick.

Don’t overcook, otherwise the eggs will be cooked.

Heat off.   Cool to around 60°C and add the bloomed gelatin.

Pour in the caramel sauce & stir until smooth.

Fold in the whipped cream.

Salted Caramel Pear Cake1Assemble

Once the cake is cool, cut out the uneven edges & top, then cut in the middle into 2 pieces.

Brush the cake with some white wine syrup.

Arrange the pears evenly on the cake & spread a layer of bavarois on top.

Place another piece of cake on top & brush with some white wine syrup.

Spread remaining bavarois all over the cake & decorate as you like.

Refrigerate to set before serving.

 

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